Home Nutrition

Nutrition

With more people opting to follow specific diets such as vegetarianism and veganism, there is an increased chance of a prevailing nutritional deficit, especially in certain essential nutrients that the body does not synthesize on its own. Some of these are Vitamins, dietary minerals, amino acids and essential fatty acids.  Out of these, vegans and vegetarians may have an increased probability of missing out on Omega 3 fatty acids' required intake because their primary food source is fish, fish oil and seafood. Clinical studies even suggest  Omega 3 fatty acid are depressed in vegetarians, especially in vegans. Omega 3 fatty acids are a group of healthy polyunsaturated fats that are needed for the normal functioning of many processes in the body. They are of three types - Alpha-Linoleic Acids (APA - derived from plant sources), Eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic acids (DHA). Both EPA and DHA are derived from seafood and fish oil. These fatty acids are vital for our body's proper functioning and have potent cardioprotective properties with regulated intake and prolonged use.  While the daily recommended dietary allowance of Omega 3 fatty acids is around 200-500 mg a day, the exclusion of marine food such as fatty fish, oysters from one’s diet makes it very difficult to meet. There is a significant imbalance of Omega-3 fatty acid levels in vegetarian and vegan diets.  This is further sustained by the fact that there has been a massive drop in the nutritional levels of plants owing to the industrial shift in agricultural processes such as employing the use of fertilisers and pesticides instead of practising organic farming.  It is suggested that Vegetarians should double the current adequate intake of ALA if no direct sources of EPA and DHA are consumed.  Even though plant-based sources like kale and spinach contain a good amount of Omega-3 fatty acids, they fail to meet the minimum recommended intake requirements. Flaxseed is known to be one of the best plant sources for Omega-3 fatty acids, offering 22815mg of the nutrient per 100gm. Other sources like hemp, kidney beans, walnuts, or seaweed are also rich in Omega-3. However, all of these (including flaxseed) are not a part of our daily diet. Even if we consume them every day, they are not consumed in the quantity that helps meet the daily required intake of Omega-3. Due to these limited options, Omega-3 levels are extremely low among vegetarians and virtually absent among vegans, causing a significant deficiency in the plasma, blood, and tissue levels of EPA and DHA. Therefore, it is advisable and beneficial for vegans and vegetarians to supplement their diet with Omega-3 supplements.  Vegetarians who experience increased needs of Omega-3 fatty acids or delayed conversion abilities may benefit from consuming microalgae-based EPA or DHA supplements.   Besides, TrueBasics Vegan Omega is a great option to consider. A blend of specially formulated Non-GMO, 100% vegetarian Omega-3 fatty acids, this supplement has been designed to fulfill your day's omega-3 requirement in a single dose. It contains PKVNL 60 — an advanced variety of flaxseed that has been developed under the National Agricultural Innovation Project to provide the most potent extract of Omega-3 fatty acids.  Therefore, consuming just one pill a day, post-dinner, at bedtime can help offer the same amount of Omega 3 Fatty Acids as are available through any fish oil supplement. This makes TrueBasics Vegan Omega the most appropriate option of Omega-3 supplementation for vegans and vegetarians. Consume it daily to reap the benefits for heart health, mental wellness, and joint health. 

Who Needs Omega-3?

There are two types of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids needed for the normal functioning of the body. These are Omega-3 fatty acids and Omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are widely distributed throughout nature and play a significant role in the human diet and physiology.  Primarily, there are three types of Omega-3 fatty acids required by the body:  Alpha-Linoleic Acids (ALA): They are the most abundant form of Omega-3 fatty acids and are primarily found in plants. ALA needs to be converted into EPA or DHA to be processed by the body. Foods like kale, spinach, walnuts and hemp are a few rich sources of ALA. Eicosapentaenoic Acids (EPA): They are a form of long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids. The body uses EPA to produce signaling molecules called eicosanoids which help in reducing inflammation. Foods like salmon, eel, and shrimp are said to be potent sources of EPA. Docosahexaenoic Acids (DHA): They are an important component of the retina and skin and linked to aiding cognitive development. Foods like fatty fish and algae are a few good sources of DHA. Who Needs Omega-3 Fatty Acids?  Individuals require omega 3 fatty acids of all age groups as they offer different benefits to the human body throughout its life cycle. Here is what Omega-3 helps with in children, adults, and in elderly. It is crucial to understand to make informed choices:  For Children  In children, Omega 3 is particularly helpful in aiding growth and development. Therefore, an adequate intake of this essential nutrient is a must from pregnancy. Omega 3 helps to boost mental development, besides aiding cognitive development and reducing the risk of developing diabetes, asthma, and depression in children. Omega 3 also helps toddlers develop language, movement, vision, and learning abilities.  Helps Cognitive Development: Research indicates that infants fed formulas enriched with Omega-3 fatty acids, primarily DHA, displayed significantly increased attention span levels. Their learning capabilities were remarkably enhanced and so was their social awareness, owing to regular consumption of the required amounts of EPA and DHA. 
Omega 3 fatty acids are among the essential nutrients that a human body cannot produce on its own, and thus we need to consume them in our diet via food or in the form of health supplements.  Omega 3 fatty acids are primarily essential polyunsaturated fatty acids or PUFAs, and they can be naturally found in several food items such as seafood, plant oils, and nuts.  However, as per dietary recommendations, adequate nutrition is not always possible from their diet alone, and there is a need to supplement the diet to meet the nutritional gap.  Among the many Omega-3 supplements available in the market, it is important to pick one that offers high-quality ingredients and is backed by ample research to ensure you are consuming nothing but the best.  How To Know Which Omega-3 Supplement Is Best For You? Here are some steps you can follow to easily pick the most suitable Omega-3 supplement based on your body’s requirements: Out of the three Omega 3s EPA and DHA (obtained from fish oil, fish, and marine food sources), they are proven to offer the maximum health benefits compared to ALA (obtained from plant sources). Our body does eventually convert ALA to EPA and DHA, but that happens in a minimal amount and largely depends upon the quality of the Omega-3 source. Therefore, if you are a non-vegetarian, it is best to opt for a fish oil supplement like TrueBasics Omega 3. However, if you are a vegetarian, you can opt for algal oil supplements, and for vegans, flaxseed oil supplements such as the TrueBasics Vegan Omega are the best. An important consideration while selecting your Omega-3 supplement is the supplement label. Check it to understand how much of each Omega 3 are you getting per capsule. Especially check for the EPA-DHA balance and accordingly select the supplement that best suits your requirement.  The purity of the source of Omega 3 is critical to avoid any side effects and gain maximum benefits. The choice of fish in fish-oil sources of Omega-3 fatty acids plays a significant role in the supplement's efficacy. It is best to avoid long-living fish species like mackerel, sharks, or swordfish, as they have a high concentration of heavy metals like mercury in their tissue. These are contaminants that eventually find their way into our bodies and compromise our health, leading to non-compliance to supplement therapy. Instead, opt for a supplement that derives its fish oil from short-lived fish species like salmon for the best results. One of the major factors that deter most people from using Omega-3 supplements is the fishy aftertaste. However, if you opt for a product that comes with enteric-coated capsules, it makes for an intelligent choice. These capsules not only keep the fishy smell at bay but also prevent gastric irritation. This is a significant factor that makes TrueBasics Omega-3 capsules the preferred choice of many.  What Makes Truebasics Omega-3 Supplements Trustworthy And Beneficial? TrueBasics Omega 3 supplements are thoughtfully curated with the best quality research-backed ingredients clinically proven for their efficacy. They are gluten-free, non-GMO, FSSAI approved, scientifically formulated compositions. 

Omega 3 Benefits

Omega-3 fatty acids are an essential group of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that are important for our body's proper functioning. These fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the body and absorbed by an external source.  There are three types of Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Alpha-Linoleic Acids (ALA)Docosahexaenoic Acids (DHA)Eicosapentaenoic Acids (EPA) Benefits Of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Omega-3 fatty acids play a major role in the body's growth and development and are responsible for carrying out various functions that sustain it. Here are some ways in which Omega-3 fatty acids affect our health and offer multiple benefits to various parts of our body: Benefits for the Heart Omega-3 fatty acids have the following benefits for cardiovascular health:  ● Aids in Regulating Circulation: Omega-3 fatty acids help improve blood circulation by restricting platelet aggregation and promoting the dilation of blood vessels.  ● Helps in Preventing Cardiovascular Diseases: Research has shown that the regular supplementation of Omega-3 fatty acids reduces bad cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in the bloodstream, which lessens the chances of developing heart disease.  ● Supports Plaque Reduction: Consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids helps delay the buildup of plaque — a substance composed of fat, cholesterol, and calcium, which hardens and blocks your arteries upon coagulation. ● Helps Prevent Cardiac Arrhythmia: Omega-3 fatty acids help stabilize the heart's electrical activity, which helps maintain the normal heart rhythm/beat.
Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for the proper functioning of multiple processes in the human body. There are three main types of omega-3 fatty acids – Alpha-Linolenic acid (ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). While ALA is mostly used as an energy...
Omega -3 fatty acids are found in several food sources. Some of these are natural, while others are fortified with the nutrient for added health benefits.  Omega-3 fatty acids are found in plant-based foods and marine fish and seafood, among the natural food sources.  Out of the three types of Omega-3 fatty acids — ALA, DHA, and EPA, plant-based foods are rich in ALA. Here are some examples along with the amount of Omega-3 they offer: Plant-Based FoodOmega-3 Fatty Acids they offer per standard serving size of 100 gramChia Seeds18070 mgWalnuts9178 mgFlax Seeds22815 mgSoybeans1425 mgHemp Seeds21428 mg In addition to the nuts and seeds mentioned above, some plant oils are also good sources of Omega-3 fatty acids. These are -  Flaxseed oilCanola OilSoybean OilPerilla oil (only to be used for dressing in very minimal amounts as it is a highly saturated oil) Our body can convert some ALA into EPA and DHA. However, this type of conversion is not frequent, and the amount produced is insufficient. Therefore, the best way to maintain the required levels of these Omega-3 fatty acids in our body is through the foods we eat.  Also, both these fatty acids play different roles in our body. While EPA affects blood clotting and offers cardiovascular benefits, DHA plays a role in signaling between the nerves. It also positively impacts vision quality. As compared to the other organs in our body, our eyes and the brain have high DHA content. Hence, low DHA levels are associated with poor visual function and cognitive development.  EPA & DHA are, therefore, needed by our bodies to ensure normal functioning of the brain, heart, eyes, and joints. They also impact skin and hair health. ALA, on the other hand, reduces body inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines — the inflammation-causing substances in our body.     
Omega 3 Fatty Acids are essential fats in the human body that can only be derived from their diet. Omega-3 is associated with enhancing our body with several health benefits. It cannot be produced in the body; hence it has to be derived from the diet through the foods we...
There has been so much discussion about fats being bad for the body, but do you know not all fat is bad? Our body can synthesize most of the fatty acids, but there are some fatty acids that our body cannot synthesize. These are called essential fatty acids. Omega 3...
Three types of fatty acids are found in Omega 3 EPA(Eicosapentaenoic Acids)DHA(Docosahexaenoic Acids)ALA (Alpha-Linolenic Acid) Both EPA and DHA are considered highly significant from a dietary perspective. While ALA can be derived from several commonly eaten plant sources, the...

What is Omega-3?

Omega 3 Fatty Acids are a family of polyunsaturated fats that are considered essential fats needed by our body for its normal and healthy functioning. However, these fatty acids must be derived from external sources of food in our daily diet as, unlike other fats, our body...

HOT NEWS